15/03/2015
lisa monaghan

Myrttinen and McInturff (2008). Gender, Small Arms and Development. The case of South Sudan

The role of small arms is intimately linked to pragmatic security and economic needs and to the definition of the appropriate roles of women and men in meeting those needs. Development and disarmament projects must meet those pragmatic needs, but they cannot do so without taking into consideration the gender roles of the community actors with whom they are engaged. The international community has become increasingly aware of the inter-linkages between the issues of gender, small arms and light weapons and development. Though there is an increasing awareness both at the policy and programming level, there is still a lack of information on and understanding
of this crucial nexus. This paper examines the situation in Southern Sudan from the point of view of the challenges faced in working with gender, small arms and light weapons and development issues. It looks at the efforts of local administrative structures, local civil society organisations, international organisations and international civil society organizations in addressing these challenges. In particular, it examines Canadian and Canadian-supported efforts in this field. Small arms continue to play a significant functional and symbolic role in the lives of the Southern Sudanese population. A return to pre-civil war values is not desirable from the point of view of women's human rights. However, some of the existing values within these communities could provide an important basis for disarmament and development efforts.

Category: Conflict, Human Rights and Protection

Sub-category: Community, International Assistance and Interventions