11/03/2015
lisa monaghan

Falge (2008). Countering Rapture. Young Nuer in New Religious Movements

In the overall whirlwind that has captured postcolonial Africa through war, structural adjustment and outmigration, young people
and their conflicts with older generations are currently prominent themes of academic observation and analysis (De Boek /Honwana 2005: 1; Alber /Martin 2007: 169). Constituting the largest group of the African continent, they open up a way to understanding broader sociopolitical and economic transformations in their struggle for education, employment and health services. Confronted with and incorporated by political conflict, armed violence and the HIV /AIDS pandemic they are forced to reinvent themselves and develop new strategies to counter the destabilizing ruptures which the penetration of the global thrusts upon them. In the literature young Africans are often simultaneously viewed as creative and destructive forces, makers and breakers (De Boek / Honwana 2005). As soldiers within African markets of violence (Elwert 1999) they take part in the marauding, raping and killing of civilians, and as major players in new informal economies and processes of globalization they struggle for a better life. Against the prominent proclamation of generational conflict in Africa (Richards 1995: 134 – 70, Abbink 2005: 1 – 34), recent research has shown that some African youth are preoccupied with both fighting a war and defending their families (Leonardis (2008), Madut (2007)). Besides, many drop out from war and become the driving forces behind the flourishing religious movements that embody the expectations and promises of Western capitalist ideals.

Category: Anthropology and History

Sub-category: Socio-Cultural Groups and Practices