01/03/2015
lisa monaghan

S. Beswick (2001). Rape, Suicide and Violence.

In war zones, militarism intensifies women’s subordination and violence against females escalates. It is often assumed that once women have fled the conflict zones of their homelands to “safe havens” in a neighboring country, security will prevail. Insecurity and violence, however, often intensify. In foreign refugee camps changes take place in the core relationships between women and men, and the legal and societal rules and laws that prevail in the home country break down.2 Thus, refugee women are often further victimized once they flee into foreign lands.

Women’s voices concerning the violent episodes in refugee camps are often muted and left unheard. Aid personnel and camp authorities are often overwhelmed with merely providing the basic necessities of life; they have little time to listen. Further, male refugees are often the rep-resentatives and go-betweens for their own communities to the official
authorities and United Nations personnel. Thus, many of the women in refugee camps in recent times have come to live in fear and isolation.

This paper presents the voices of women from three conflict zones— Ethiopia, Somalia, and South Sudan—living in Kenyan refugee camps.

Category: Human Rights and Protection